Saturday, February 8, 2020

Ronaldo part of Real's global marketing plan Essay

Ronaldo part of Real's global marketing plan - Essay Example Florentino Perez, director of the club, even admits it in the article: "One of the most important things for Real is its image". In this context the investment of US$44.25 million to transfer Ronaldo from his former Italian club Inter Milan seems nothing in regards of the foreseeable benefits of the arrival of the player. Perez adds: "We will begin selling shirts bearing the player's name immediately and we are sure there will be a massive demand. In five years we want to be in every country in the world." The statement proved to be true the very day Ronaldo signed his contract with Real Madrid. The player went to sign his shirt at the Real's boutique and broke all the records of soccer shirts sales in a day. A Ronaldo shirt costs 75 a piece. No Surprise Perez believes he will get his money's worth. Florentino Perez' strategy is obvious. He brings soccer stars from all around the world and offers them to the public. Who doe not want to see the best players of the world put together in a "dream team" Thus the skyscraping benefits of the shirt sales. However products with the Real Madrid logo are not the only source of major income for the club. With the arrival of Ronaldo, the team signed a commercial agreement with Siemens to bear the name of the mobile firm company on the team's shirt. The market share of Siemens has grown from 17% to 21% in one year.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

A Preview Of The Twentieth Century Essay Example for Free

A Preview Of The Twentieth Century Essay History tells us so much that the essence of humanity would be of a void nature without it. We can safely say that history is the collective experience of humanity itself. Thus, a distortion made upon history is irreverence to our collective experience. If one distorts history, he/she changes humanity’s life story. There is a need to preserve history as it happened. From history we learn lessons and avoid doing things that lead us to our own destruction. Take for example the two world wars that happened, if a third world war happens, then we, humanity, did not learn and care at all about our own history. History distortions commonly happen in the ideological and political arena. These distortions kill human lives. Conflicts that happen in the Europe and the Middle East as well as in America are caused by differences on the way people view religion and faith. Infamous of these are bombings caused by Muslim fundamentalists. Hence, history should be taught as it happened. History should be taught with clarity and vividness. People are intelligent enough to discern between the good and bad events that happened. Respect given for each other’s perspective and ideology should be encouraged to avoid conflicts. An integration of history arriving at the closest description of events as they happen should be done taking into consideration the differences in the religious and political beliefs of different races. Research should be done in order to correct the mistakes made on writing history. Yet, the most important of these is respect. If people cannot agree on a particular issue of history, then their only option is to respect its other’s views. There is no other alternative, they must respect each other. History is what we are. If we distort our perception of history, we change our very lives’ meaning.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Essay --

Summary A Savage War of Peace was a fantastic book to read. It detailed the history of the Algerian War for Independence, which encompasses three separate wars. All of these wars were concerned with the future of the once French, now Algerian, city of Algiers. Beginning with the First War, it was a three-way fight between the FLN, the Front de Libà ©ration Nationale, the pied noirs population living in French Algeria, and the Fourth Republic of France. This First War began in 1954 and continued until 1958. The FLN was a terror organization that was anti-West, anti-Communist, anti-Liberal, and anti-Semitic. Their members were generally many Muslim opponents of French rule. The pied noirs were generally the white settlers of Algeria, composing a minority of the overall population of Algeria. The pied noirs could be seen as an in between population, not necessarily fully French but not necessarily Algerian as well. Historically, they were affiliated with Pà ©tain’s government during World War 2 and were hostile to liberal democracy. Finally, the Fourth Republic was the then current government of the democratic country of France. They inherited a very complicated situation in Algeria from their predecessor governments. France initially gained Algeria as a part of its empire when they conquered the land from the Ottoman Empire in 1830. The original system of government allowed the Muslim population to live under Sharia Law while the European settlers lived under French law and voted in French elections. Initially, the Fourth Republic’s goal was to allow the pied noirs to be citizens of the French Republic, while allowing the Algerian population to govern themselves. Each of these three factions had their own downfalls. The FLN was para... ...he European and French view. However, as the story is so exhaustively detailed I do not think it has compromised credibility in the paper. I found this book extremely useful. As someone who is very interested in French and European history, I was amazed at how large of an impact the Algerian War had on France, for example causing the collapse of the Fourth Republic. I was also amazed that so many politicians and military leaders use this book as a history lesson on what to do in Iraq. I found that the book related to the course due to the mentioning of the French involvement in Vietnam as well as how the French tried to learn from their lessons at Dien Bien Phu when they were in Algeria. I will certainly be hanging on to this book for future reference, as well as to read again even more in depth to see if I missed any comparisons or possible lessons to be learned. Essay -- Summary A Savage War of Peace was a fantastic book to read. It detailed the history of the Algerian War for Independence, which encompasses three separate wars. All of these wars were concerned with the future of the once French, now Algerian, city of Algiers. Beginning with the First War, it was a three-way fight between the FLN, the Front de Libà ©ration Nationale, the pied noirs population living in French Algeria, and the Fourth Republic of France. This First War began in 1954 and continued until 1958. The FLN was a terror organization that was anti-West, anti-Communist, anti-Liberal, and anti-Semitic. Their members were generally many Muslim opponents of French rule. The pied noirs were generally the white settlers of Algeria, composing a minority of the overall population of Algeria. The pied noirs could be seen as an in between population, not necessarily fully French but not necessarily Algerian as well. Historically, they were affiliated with Pà ©tain’s government during World War 2 and were hostile to liberal democracy. Finally, the Fourth Republic was the then current government of the democratic country of France. They inherited a very complicated situation in Algeria from their predecessor governments. France initially gained Algeria as a part of its empire when they conquered the land from the Ottoman Empire in 1830. The original system of government allowed the Muslim population to live under Sharia Law while the European settlers lived under French law and voted in French elections. Initially, the Fourth Republic’s goal was to allow the pied noirs to be citizens of the French Republic, while allowing the Algerian population to govern themselves. Each of these three factions had their own downfalls. The FLN was para... ...he European and French view. However, as the story is so exhaustively detailed I do not think it has compromised credibility in the paper. I found this book extremely useful. As someone who is very interested in French and European history, I was amazed at how large of an impact the Algerian War had on France, for example causing the collapse of the Fourth Republic. I was also amazed that so many politicians and military leaders use this book as a history lesson on what to do in Iraq. I found that the book related to the course due to the mentioning of the French involvement in Vietnam as well as how the French tried to learn from their lessons at Dien Bien Phu when they were in Algeria. I will certainly be hanging on to this book for future reference, as well as to read again even more in depth to see if I missed any comparisons or possible lessons to be learned.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Free Trade In Society Essay

How does the society benefit from an economy built on free trade where both the labor and the buyer only seek personal gain?   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   On an economy that is built of free trade, society will run like clockwork because of the various incentives that the various sectors of the economy provide.   It is human nature for individual to act upon incentives.   Children are commonly disciplined by their parents with the use of incentives. It is the same in the case of the laborer and the buyer.   Both of them seek only personal gain.   It is highly uncommon that either buyer or laborer will act for the greater good of the nation or for world peace.   They work because they want to earn a living.   They want a nicer car, a bigger home, a good education for their children, and a trip abroad for the summer perhaps.   All their efforts are targeted to their personal goals, all of which is quantifiable in terms of money.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   The laborer will always look for a place where there is a higher monetary yield for a lesser amount of work.   He will work harder if he knows that there is a promotion ahead. The buyer, on the other hand, will always search for a good bargain for any of his purchases.   All in all, everyone wants more for their money and time.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Society benefits from this system because it creates more competition in the markets of both buyers and laborers, resulting in more options and better options for both sectors.   With this equilibrium, society benefits because the economy benefits, thus increasing the standard of living. If however, there is an oversupply of labor, wages will go down and unemployment will go up, distorting the balance.   This is the same for buyers. A lack in competition will increase prices and decrease their purchasing power.   It is therefore necessary to maintain a good equilibrium in both labor markets and buyer markets which will result in a better economy, and which will eventually result in a higher standard of living for society.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Analysis Of The Task Of The Translator - 1924 Words

Offering another possible explanation for this interest in Classical culture, Colin Teevan admits that: it does seem to me that Irish writers are drawn to these Trojan stories not simply because the current conflict in Northern Ireland might be analogous to the Trojan War, but also because in the source texts themselves Euripides and Sophocles are drawing analogies between the Trojan War and the Peloponnesian War, a conflict that bears a much greater resemblance to our own, a conflict in which Greek fought Greek and any unifying Greek identity was shattered. (84) However, while ancient history no doubt plays a part in this interest in Ireland s ancient genealogy, the act of translation plays an – at least- equally integral part. And in The Task of the Translator, Walter Benjamin touches upon aspects of translation that would seem to make translation itself an ideal metaphor for cultural exploration. Benjamin posits translation as an almost organic, evolutionary aspect of some literary works. The original literary text, he contends, is a mutable organism that changes over time: Even words with fixed meaning can undergo a maturing process. The obvious tendency of a writer s literary style may in time wither away only to give rise to immanent tendencies in the literary creation. What sounded fresh once may sound hackneyed later; what was once current may someday sound quaint. (73) Benjamin terms this period after a literary work s creation its afterlife, andShow MoreRelatedTranslation Analysis : `` The Panther `` And Madame Bovary762 Words   |  4 Pages Translation Analysis Since there is no a definitive translation of any text, multiple translations can allow us to conceive the original text (even if we don’t know the language of the source text). The study of multiple translations substantially enlarges the interpretive process and perspectives that readers draw from the text (Schulte 1994). In other words, comparing various translations of the same text as in (Charles Baudelaire Correspondence, A Multiple Reading of Rainer Maria Rilke sRead MoreManagement Planning and Ethics1121 Words   |  5 Pagesfrontline managers and includes routine tasks, such as human resources requirements. According to Bateman and Snell (2004) these three stages of planning have to be linked to form a cohesive unit. A fairly recent approach to accomplishing this is called Strategic Management. In strategic management all levels of management play a part in the design and implementation of strategic goals. This involves the creation of a vision, a mission, and long- term goals. An analysis of external opportunities and threatsRead MoreNarrative Analysis : Dynamic Equivalence 1488 Words   |  6 Pageslanguage the closest natural equivalent of the source-language message, first in terms of meaning and secondly in terms of style (Nida, 2004). He figured out that one must aim primarily at reproducing the message in the process of translating and the translator must strive for meaning equivalence rather than identity. Dynamic equivalence theory in translation is a new point in viewing receptors rather than in terms of their respective forms. The content of dynamic equivalence is that the degree to whichRead MoreExploration Of Concepts And Methodologies Of Online Machine Translators3467 Words   |  14 Pages Exploration of Concepts and Methodologies of Online Machine Translators in Two Studies Since research methodology tells research readers â€Å"who were studied, what was studied, and how the information was collected and analyzed†(Perry, 2011), it plays a great role for readers to evaluate the provided study. Methodology also affects the knowledge that researchers constructed from their studies, and then deliver to their readers. Therefore, I am going to examine how the used methods affectRead MoreAnalysis Of The Metamorphosis1501 Words   |  7 Pagesof Gregor Samsa s interpersonal relations, which is certainly relevant to a journal of family therapy. Johnson provides a brief account of the novella s plot, together with his own perspective on the fact that so much of literature and literary analysis concentrates on the relationships that the characters have. In this case, the author examines the family as composed of children of ineffectual parents. While this writer does not know this with certainty, it is possible that many cases requiringRead MoreHow Culture Influences Advertisement Translation2176 Words   |  9 Pagescommercial. Literal translations are for this reason not enough effective because the translator should also reproduce the atmosphere and feeling of the slogan, attract the attention and create memorable phrases which in a different target language could be quite different from the source language. Translation can be intended as a product or as a process. The process of translation involves the translator who has the task of changing the original text (source text) in a source language into a text (targetRead MoreKite Persian Translations Of George Orwell s Animal Farm3324 Words   |  14 PagesA contrastive analysis of the technique of explicitation used in three Persian translations of George Orwell s Animal Farm 1. Introduction Translators always have attempted and sought to translate a text from the source language (SL) into the target Language (TL) in way that is tangible for the TL readers. However, translators while translating may encounter situations in which there is a text understandable in the SL, but difficult to be translated if they want to adhere to the source text (ST)Read MoreImportance Of Home Router Security And The Security Of Home Routers1078 Words   |  5 Pageshave various security issues which expose them to malware attacks. To address the growing concerns about the security of home routers, it is important to perform dynamic analysis on home routers, even without accessing the actual hardware. This paper looks at the importance of home router security, the need for dedicated analysis tools through emulation and the process involved in emulating and profiling an ARM architecture based home router. We emulate an ARM router and test the behaviour of thisRead MoreProcess Of Machine Translation965 Words   |  4 PagesTranslation (SMT) is one of these applications that have achieved significant impact with the help of such corpora. The main challenge for the success of the translation process is the access to high-quality training data. This can ease the task for translators, by providing an initial translation, which can be later post-edited (Green et al. 2013). Basically, the SMT systems are generally trained using sentence-aligned parallel corpora (Brown et al. 1993; Callison-Burch et al. 2004). Further, usingRead MoreRoaring Dragon Hotel : Good Management Qualities1354 Words   |  6 PagesManagement Qualities Ranjith Anchuri (Student Id: ranchu8018) Sullivan University Executive Summary This proposal explains a thorough analysis on the good management qualities of organization. Major issue in the organization was the conflicts between management and their employees, which can be solved to get better performance and profits. These conflicts occur between management and employees

Saturday, December 28, 2019

The Social Changes Of The Lowell Mills System - 1454 Words

As the Industrial Revolution spread across the western world, America found itself amidst the innovations the revolution brought. One of these social changes was the increase of women in the workforce. This led to the positive experience of The Lowell Mills system that enabled more opportunities for women to become more independent by giving them more control in their lives, more chances to use their intellect, and an overall different change of the life path a woman can take. Due to the demand of labor occurring in America, industries were at a deficit in workers. This led for young women to be hired to fill the gaps of labor of the deficit. This change went against society’s perception of a woman’s role. Before industries allowed women†¦show more content†¦Working women also showed that they were not less lady-like, because in the mills they were able to live in decent conditions. According to Reverend Henry A. Mills the boardinghouses were to be kept â€Å"both inside and out†¦clean and in good condition,† (2) this allowed for women to live healthfully, clean, and orderly. They had busy schedules but that did not make them live any less than normal than any other women. The women also found that the new control they had in their lives led to a significant increase in their independence. With leaving their home, parents found that they had less command over their daughters’ lives. This situation is seen in a concerned letter from a stepmother to her stepdaughter who was working in a mill in New Hampshire: â€Å"your reputation your happiness all you hold dear are I fear at stake† (21). This letter was written by a stepmother who feared that the boy the girl fell in love would not bring her full happiness. Unlike previous times, the mother was no longer able to be beside the young woman to give direct council and have more say in who her daughter can or cannot see, allowing more independence in the daughter’s life. This independence also grew more from not just separation from parental guidance but the kind of lifestyle the workers took on. In the Lowell Offering, oneShow MoreRelatedLowell Mills1346 Words   |  6 PagesThe Lowell textile mills The Lowell textile mills were a new transition in American history that explored working and labor conditions in the new industrial factories in American. To describe the Lowell Textile mills it requires a look back in history to study, discover and gain knowledge of the industrial labor and factory systems of industrial America. These mass production mills looked pretty promising at their beginning but after years of being in business showed multiple problems and setbacksRead MoreThe Lowell Work Force, And The Social Origins Of Women Workers946 Words   |  4 Pagesfirst article was chapter three, â€Å"The Lowell Work Force, 1836, and the Social Origins of Women Workers† from the book, Women at Work: The Transformation of Work and Community in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1826-1860, written by Thomas Dublin. It paralleled nicely with the article I chose which was, â€Å"‘I Think Less of the Factory than of my Native Dell’ Labor, Nature, and the Lowell ‘Mill Girls’† from Environmental History, by Chad Montrie. The article, â€Å"The Lowell Work Force† primarily discussed what typeRead MoreImpact Of The Market Revolution On American History1460 Words   |  6 PagesThe Market Revolution was the most fundamental change in American history all because of three very important developments. These developments consisted of transportation, commercialization and industrialization. Transportation developed many more ways to get around by roads, canals, steamboats and even railroads. Commercialization began to replace household self-sufficiency with goods that were starting to be produced for a cash market. Industrialization was life changing for all of goods that wereRead MoreEssay about Mary Pauls Letters951 Words   |  4 PagesEssay Assignment: Market Revolution During the nineteenth century, America went through a number of social, economic and political changes. Revolutions in manufacturing and commerce led to substantial economic growth. Several cultural movements reformed American society. Mary Paul, once just a normal girl from Vermont, led a life that was shaped by the changes of the 1800s. The information gathered from Mary Pauls letters to her father make it clear that Marys life experiences turned her intoRead More The Market Revolution Essay1042 Words   |  5 Pagesstarted to occur in the United States throughout the early 1800’s. There was a shift from an agricultural economy to an industrial market system. After the War of 1812, the domestic marketplace changed due to the strong pressure of social and economic forces. Major innovations in transportation allowed the movement of information, people, and merchandise. Textile mills and factories became an important base for jobs, especially for women. There was also wi despread economic growth during this time periodRead MoreThe Morality Of Slave Labor Versus Free Market Capitalism1095 Words   |  5 PagesEuropean philosophers could hope for. The image of â€Å"Lowell Offering† depicts free market labor in which the worker is paid for the fruits of their labor. â€Å"Slavery Justified† by George Fitzhugh is a moral argument in favor of the slave system, suggesting it provides more equality than the abolitionist view of â€Å"equality† and â€Å"liberty provides. George Fitzhugh in â€Å"Slavery Justified† explains how slavery leads to increased equality and social cohesion. He also suggests that there are racial differencesRead MoreEssay on The Market Revolution1054 Words   |  5 Pagesstarted to occur in the United States throughout the early 1800’s. There was a shift from an agricultural economy to an industrial market system. After the War of 1812, the domestic marketplace changed due to the strong pressure of social and economic forces. Major innovations in transportation allowed the movement of information, people, and merchandise. Textile mills and factories became an important base for jobs, especially for women. There was also widespread economic growth during this time periodRead MoreU.S. Economy in 1800s1528 Words   |  7 Pagestextile factories changed during this period. The small mills with a few dozen spindles and looms that characterized the initial period of the industry gave way to larger compl exes. This pattern began with the Boston Associates complex at Waltham, Massachusetts. Waltham itself soon appeared small as the Boston Associates developed Lowell on the Merrimac River. The population of Lowell increased from 2,500 in 1826 to 35,000 in 1850. The Lowell Machine Shop became a center for innovation not only inRead MoreTechnology That Changed Global Living1586 Words   |  7 Pagestrains help get goods and transform goods to one place to another, steel plow and mechanical reaper help agriculture working easier, and American System of Manufacturing made producing goods less time consuming, created more jobs, and less complex. To begin with, the impact of railroads on the Industrial Revolution changed economy, and social change to this country. The railroad was first invented in Great Britain by George Stephenson. â€Å"Railroads would drop shipping cost by 60 % - 70%.† TheRead MoreThe Industrial Revolution Essay847 Words   |  4 PagesRevolution During the 1800s, phenomenal changes took place in America. These changes would impact our society incredibly for years to come and even still in the present. The major changes that took place were in transportation and industry. American society expanded so much in the early 1800s that it very well could have been the only time in history where this happened in such a short amount of time. From steamboats to railroads and from textile mills to interchangeable parts, the revolutions

Thursday, December 19, 2019

The Pros And Cons Of The Utopian Society - 979 Words

Throughout history, many utopian societies have been established in hopes of creating a protected and uniform environment. In order to maintain a perfectly equal and errorless environment, some basic human rights are often violated. Many of the utopian principles put in place are based on the fear that the citizens will gain knowledge and notice the absence of their basic human rights. Unfortunately, once the citizens figure out that the government has infringed on their civil liberties they become disillusioned and want to revolt. This ultimately causes dissention and unhappiness throughout the utopia, which defeats the sole intention the leaders had when creating it. To avoid the rebellion, leaders of utopian experiments infringe on†¦show more content†¦In contrast, the utopian leaders used censorship as a way to limit and control the flow of information, avoid dissention and promote the concept that thinking the same as everyone else is a good quality. Leaders of utopian experiments infringe on civil liberties in order to maintain a balanced and equal society which is shown through the lack of individual identity. Citizens in a utopian society have no personal identity because their leader has forced them to think the same and act the same in the hope of creating a perfect and uniform society. The government wants to make sure that no person has the ability to come up with a new or dissenting opinion from what the utopia dictates. In an effort to bond the citizens around the utopian beliefs the government controls what the citizens worship, read, or watch on TV. This is evident in the Jonestown society. Jim Jones was the leader of this society organization and had a following of over 900 people. Everyone’s daily agenda was the same and he made them believe and feel that he was the only one that cared for them. He made the people depend on him by giving them all the necessities to live - jobs, a home, an education, and food. In return, he gained their loyalty and their financial trust. So much so, they were willing to die for him and his beliefs. Therefore, stripping people of their personal identity allows the utopian society to thrive because it creates aShow MoreRelatedSurveillance In George Orwells 19841219 Words   |  5 Pagesthe futuristic society of Oceania, where the government of the Party, under the leadership of Big Brother, maintains strict control of the people and prevents free thought through propaganda, censorship, and surveillance. Winston tries to think freely while evading detection and succeeds for a time in having an affair with his co-conspirator Julia, but the Party eventually captures and re-educates both of them. Surveillance has also become a controversial issue in today’s society, as Heather KellyRead MoreCommunism: A Social Economic System1801 Words   |  7 PagesCommunism: A Social Economic System in which all property and resources are collectively owned by a society not by individual citizens. It is a system of Government in which state controls the economy or the elected party is responsible for the progress of people and economy, and all goods are equally shared and distributed among all the people by the state or the elected Party who holds Power. The Theory of Communism is to create Government under which all the natives are equal. Government takesRead MoreCould Anarchy Work? Essay1124 Words   |  5 Pages B a state of lawlessness or political disorder due to absence of government authIrity. C. a utopian society of individuals who enjoy complete freedom without government. The opinion of whether anarchy could work or not is lead up to what a person thinks of it. Is it a state of disorder like definition B states? Is it just a neutral absence of government like definition A says? Or is it a utopian society as definition C declares? It is up for one to decide based on the information they gather. Read MoreCultivating Conscience Book866 Words   |  3 Pages Lynn Stout’s Cultivating Conscience Cultivating Conscience is a book in which the author, Lynn Stout, debates the effectiveness of using material incentives in law as a way to lessen the amount criminal activities performed in modern society. Material incentives, according to Stout, are only part of the complex equation that is behavior. Throughout the book the author gives examples of research-based theories that prove there are many other ways to lessen delinquent activities that do not involveRead MoreCommentary on Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy846 Words   |  4 Pagespopularized for exploring utopian ideas (such as Aldous Huxley’s The Island) and dystopian possibilities (as in George Orwell’s 1984), but there hasn’t been a novel that explores both of these ideas in a parallel manner quite like Marge Piercy’s Woman on the Edge of Time. Using the concept of time travel, Piercy is able to place both worlds side by side creating a â€Å"grass is always greener on the other sid e† mentality while also stressing the importance that every society and generation should analyzeRead MoreMedia s Influence On Society1269 Words   |  6 Pagesinformational and a great source for entertainment it also has a large binding influence on societies all over the world. Media aspects are radically reshaping the world (Marina 240) and though some may argue that media has more negative aspects associated with it, there are many positives to it as well. One of the positive aspects of the mass media is the binding influence associated with it and how it is changing our society making the world one large global village — the world as a single community. We nowRead MoreMedia s Influence On Society1256 Words   |  6 Pagesinformative and a great source for entertainment, it also has a large binding influence on societies all over the world. Media aspects are radically reshaping the world (Marina 240) and though some may argue that media has more negative aspects associated with it, there are many positives to it as well. One of the positive aspects of the media is the binding influence associated with it and how it is changing our society making the world one large global village — the world as a single community. We nowRead MoreBuilding Our Own Utopia Essay1766 Words   |  8 Pagescollect energy (Geothermal Cons and Pros). These is because wind and solar power do not waste anything, or affect any of their surroundings since once the sun hits the panel the light just continues in its normal direction. On the other hand, geothermal energy can be used up if it is all collected in one place (Geothermal Cons and Pros). In addition, geothermal energy cannot be found anywhere in the world unlike wind, solar, and hydro electricity (Bavota, Geothermal Cons and Pros). In continuationRead MoreLearning Theories And Their Application816 Words   |  4 Pagesorganism exhibits conditioned response to the conditional stimulus even though the latter is presented alone. Operant Conditioning – This is a learning method which occurs through rewards and punishments for behavior. The subject learns about its pros and cons by the acclaims and criticisms it gets for its behavior. There are a number of theorists and psychologists who have contributed to the theory of behaviorism. Naming a few: B. F. Skinner, Ivan Pavlov, Clark Hull, John B. Watson, etc. SignificantRead MoreThe Inequality And Inhumane Gap Between The Rich And The Poor936 Words   |  4 Pagesare dying to survive. This idea was built so that the rich could no longer take advantage of the poor. Marx spent years of his life trying to come up with the best systematic government in order to protect the rights of those who have no voice in society. He believed that the working class men or otherwise known as â€Å"the blue-colored men† are the the wheels that keep a country running and therefore should not be discriminated against due to their social status. Communism is a government in which even